Black History Month Day 29

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Carter G. Woodson

by Korey Bowers Brown

During the dawning decades of the twentieth century, it was commonly presumed that black people had little history besides the subjugation
of slavery.  Today, it is clear that blacks have significantly impacted the development of the social, political, and economic structures of the United States and the world.  Credit for the evolving awareness of the true place of blacks in history can, in large part, be bestowed on
one man, Carter G. Woodson.  And, his brainchild the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. is continuing Woodson’s tradition of disseminating information about black life, history and culture to the global community.

Known as the “Father of Black History,” Woodson (1875-1950) was the son of former slaves, and understood how important gaining a proper education is when striving to secure and make the most out of one’s divine right of freedom. Although he did not begin his formal education until he was 20 years old, his dedication to study enabled him to earn a high school diploma in West Virginia and bachelor and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago in just a few years.  In 1912, Woodson became the second African American to earn a PhD at Harvard University.
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Black History Month Day 28

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Rebecca J. Cole

(16 March 1846–14 August 1922) was an American physician. In 1867, she became the second African American woman to become a doctor in the United States after Rebecca Crumpler‘s achievement three years earlier.

Cole was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and would overcome racial and gender barriers to medical education by training in all-female institutions run by women who had been part of the first generation of female physicians graduating mid-century. Cole attended the Institute for Colored Youth, graduating in 1863. She then went on to graduate from the <a title="Drexel University College of Medicine" href="http://en.wikipedia.org Continue reading

Black History Month Day 27

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Thomas “Blind Tom” Wiggins

(May 25, 1849 – June 14, 1908) was an African American autistic savant and musical prodigy on the piano. He had numerous original compositions published and had a lengthy and largely successful performing career throughout the United States. During the 19th century, he was one of the most well-known American performing pianists.

Wiggins was born on the Wiley Edward Jones Plantation in Harris County, Georgia. Blind at birth, he was sold in 1850 along with his enslaved parents, Charity and Mingo Wiggins, to a Columbus, Georgia lawyer, General James Neil Bethune.[1] Bethune was “almost the pioneer free trader” in the United States and “the first [newspaper] editor in the south to openly advocate secession” [2]. The new owner re-named the child Thomas Greene Bethune or Thomas Wiggins Bethune (according to different sources). Continue reading

Black History Month Day 26

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Bessie Coleman. Reproduced by permission of the Corbis Corporation.

Bessie Coleman

First African American to earn an international pilot’s license

 

Bessie Coleman was the first African American to earn an international pilot’s license. She dazzled crowds with her stunts at air shows and refused to be slowed by racism.

She would be a leader, she said, in introducing aviation to her race. She would found a school for aviators of any race, and she would appear before audiences in churches, schools, and theaters to spark the interest of African Americans in the new, expanding technology of flight. Continue reading

Black History Month Day 25

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Col. Guion S. Bluford Jr

From Air Force Pilot to First Black Astronaut

Col. Guion S. Bluford Jr.: After flying combat missions over Vietnam as a U.S. Air Force pilot, he went on to become one of America’s first black astronauts. He flew 144 combat missions, 65 over North Vietnam, as a member of the 557th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam.

Lillian E. Fishburne

First Black Female Rear Admiral

Lillian E. Fishburne: Appointed by President Bill Clinton, she became the first African-American woman to hold the rank of rear admiral. The appointment also made the now-retired Fishburne the highest-ranking African-American woman in the U.S. Navy.

Thanks to Tanisha and Bryan Jones and their daughter Sinai for compiling these profiles from the following sources:

1) The Encyclopedia of African-American Heritage, by Susan Altman
2) The Roots website, theroots.com
3) Famous Black Inventors website, black-inventor.com

Black History Month–Day 24

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Gen. Colin L. Powell

First Black Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff

Gen. Colin L. Powell: He served 35 years in the U.S. Army, rising to the rank of four-star general and becoming the first black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1989 to 1993). National security adviser to President Ronald Reagan, he was appointed secretary of state in 2001 in George W. Bush’s administration. He received numerous awards, including two Presidential Medals of Freedom, the Defense Distinguished Service Medal (with three Oak Leaf Clusters), a Purple Heart and numerous decorations from other countries.

Pfc. Milton Olive III

Service in Vietnam

Pfc. Milton Olive III: He was posthumously awarded a Medal of Honor for saving the lives of four other U.S. Army soldiers during a battle early in the Vietnam War. Milton used his body to cover a grenade to save his fellow soldiers. “It was the most incredible display of selfless bravery I ever witnessed,” the platoon commander later told a journalist.

Thanks to Tanisha and Bryan Jones and their daughter Sinai for compiling these profiles from the following sources:

1) The Encyclopedia of African-American Heritage, by Susan Altman
2) The Roots website, theroots.com
3) Famous Black Inventors website, black-inventor.com

Black History Month Day 23

In honor of Black History Month, here are few profiles of contributors to history of African descent:

Gen. Roscoe Robinson Jr.

U.S. Army’s First Black Four-Star General

Gen. Roscoe Robinson Jr.: Before Gen. Colin Powell, there was Robinson, who became the first African-American four-star general in the U.S. Army. The West Point graduate’s career spanned two wars and four stars. In 1993 West Point recognized him as a distinguished graduate.

South Carolina Military Museum

Cpl. Freddie Stowers

Above and Beyond the Call of Duty (Medal of Honor)

Cpl. Freddie Stowers: On Sept. 28, 1918, while serving as squad leader of Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 93rd Division, Stowers went above and beyond the call of duty when his company led the attack at Hill 188, Champagne Marne Sector, France, according to his Medal of Honor citation. (The medal was presented to Stowers’ surviving sisters during ceremonies at the White House on April 24, 1991.)
Thanks to Tanisha and Bryan Jones and their daughter Sinai for compiling these profiles from the following sources:

1) The Encyclopedia of African-American Heritage, by Susan Altman
2) The Roots website, theroots.com
3) Famous Black Inventors website, black-inventor.com